Categories
Theology

Heaven Is Not What You Think It Is

I’m a 90s kid. That means I watched a lot of TV. And one scene from a cartoon (Looney Tunes maybe?) is forever etched in my mind.

I can’t remember the context of the episode but it’s a picture of heaven. It’s portrayed as an expanse filled with clouds. A chubby little baby in a diaper is an angel seated on a puffy cloud playing a harp.

Apparently this is paradise for all eternity.

This image shaped my theology of heaven more than anything when I was a kid. It made me not want to go to heaven. Ever. I’m going to be a fat, diapered baby sitting alone for all my days? No, thanks.

If we’re honest, most of us would think of heaven to be some version of this boring, awkward scene. Maybe not the diaper part. But an ethereal, vague, and serious place full of light fog.

This isn’t the picture painted by the Bible. Even the idea of heaven as a location “out there” that we “go to” is foreign to Jesus and his apostles.

In the end, Heaven comes down, as the New Jerusalem, the New Creation, the New Heavens and New Earth. It’s the place God lives and where his people live with him as they were meant to originally in the Garden. This time, without the possibility of rebellion.

The picture painted of heaven in the Scriptures has more continuity with this world than we might dare to think. Does it feel a tad bit unspiritual to consider “heaven” being like this earth? Remember, God made us for this world. It is our home. And it will be our home (see Romans 8:22-24).

This world simply isn’t the finished product yet. Neither are we.

In the the last two chapters of the Bible, Revelation 21-22, we see the finished product. And it’s glorious.

There’s no need for security at the city gates. The very best of human culture is ushered in and celebrated. There’s no off-season for harvesting crops. God and his people dwell together in sweet intimacy. They see each other face to face. There’s no more sun—God’s brilliance lights up the world. And his people will reign with him.

It’s the place where everyone looks out for everyone else. Where everyone is more concerned for their neighbor than themselves. Where there is always perfect joy and delight and laughter. Where there is no pain or tears or mess-ups or accidents or disease or disaster or devils or death.

It’s a world of love, because the God who is love is there and we will finally be with him in his presence.

In other words, “heaven” is the place and society “that we long for, [but] that we feel so far away” from, this side of Eden. It’s what this world was meant to be. And will be…someday.

It’s way better than what the cartoons told us. And it can’t come soon enough.

Come, Lord Jesus. Come.

Categories
Theology

Monday Miscellanies: Happiness in Heaven

A guest post by Jonathan Edwards

95. Happiness in Heaven

When the body enjoys the perfections of health and strength, the motion of the animal spirits are not only brisk and free, but also harmonious; there is a regular proportion in the motion from all parts of the body, that begets delight in the soul and makes the body feel pleasantly all over—God has so excellently contrived the nerves and parts of the human body. But few men since the fall, especially since the flood, have health to so great a perfection as to have much of this harmonious motion. When it is enjoyed, one whose nature is not very much vitiated and depraved is very much assisted thereby in every exercise of body or mind; and it fits one for the contemplation of more exalted and spiritual excellencies and harmonies, as music does.

But we need not doubt, but this harmony will be in its perfection in the bodies of the saints after the resurrection; and that, as every part of the bodies of the wicked shall be excruciated with intolerable pain, so every part of the saints’ refined bodies shall be as full of pleasure as they can hold; and that this will not take the mind off from, but prompt and help it in spiritual delights, to which even the delight of their spiritual bodies shall be but a shadow.

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Life

The Future Hope of Advent

For behold, I create new heavens and a new earth, and the former things shall not be remembered or come into mind. (Isaiah 65:17)

The Israelites were a people in-between the times. They had been given all the promises of God and a promised land in which to dwell (Rom. 9:4). But they were awaiting the advent of their Messiah. All those who truly loved and worshiped Yahweh and had faith in the Savior’s coming inherited salvation, but it was not final. 

The first advent of Jesus–his birth in a grungy manger in a village called Bethlehem–was the beginning of hope for God’s people. Jesus’ first coming was the fulfillment of the promise God made to Israel that a Messiah, an anointed King, would come to bring salvation to Israel. He accomplished this salvation through his death and resurrection. This salvation event was not just for Israel, however. Even at his dedication in the temple as an infant, Simeon recognized the baby Jesus as much more than an Israelite king: “Lord, now you are letting your servant depart in peace…for my eyes have seen your salvation that you have prepared in the presence of all peoples, a light for revelation to the Gentiles, and for glory to your people Israel” (Luke 2:29-32).

For all who believe (i.e. have faith) in Jesus, God gives them the right to become children of God (John 1:12-13). But life isn’t perfect at that point. Even Christians admit that the world and their own lives are broken, horrifically broken. Christians–Jew or Gentile, rich or poor, male or female, young or old–have inherited salvation, indeed; but it is not final.

Like the Israelites, Christians are people in-between the times. We have the promise of salvation through Jesus Christ. We have faith that his first advent brought about his death and resurrection which inaugurated a new covenant. We have the hope of eternal life. So we wait for his second advent when he will make our salvation final. Paul calls this our “blessed hope” (Titus 2:13). At his second advent, he will bring the new heavens and the new earth. There will be no more crying, no more pain, no more sin (Rev. 21:4). There will be nothing unclean in this new world (Rev. 21:27). We will be perfect. The world will be perfect.

The happiness and peace and music and joy and fun and laughter and good food and generosity you experience at Christmas ultimately points to a world where we will experience nothing but that and a million other charms we cannot begin to imagine. Christmas ultimately points to the fact that Jesus was born for one purpose: to shed his blood to create a new people for God so that they might worship him in glory for all eternity in a new world.

Do you rejoice in the future hope of Advent? Do you believe it will actually happen? Celebrate Christmas this year knowing and treasuring the fact that your Savior will return once more to meet you face-to-face, make your salvation final, and restore this world to be everything it was intended to be.

Categories
Life

Spurgeon Sermon Wordle

From Spurgeon’s sermon on John 5:40.

Wordle: Spurgeon Sermon on John 5:40

Categories
Theology

John Shore: You Can’t Know If Hell is Real

John Shore has been writing a little bit about hell lately. He has written a response (reaction?) to a promo video by Francis Chan about his new book Erasing Hell.  Hmmm, a quick, public response to a promo-video about a book about hell. Sound familiar? (Funny how people criticize others for doing the same thing, but when the ball is in their court…)

In another article on his personal blog, Shore writes about if hell is real. In typical liberal fashion, he avoids the answer and claims the Bible does as well:

Asking whether or not hell is real is like asking your teammates in a football huddle during a game whether or not they think it’s possible, from your guys’ current position on the field, to sink a three-point basket.

Wrong question.

Wrong game.

Missing the point.