Symphonies and the Trinity

The Trinity — the fact that God exists as three persons in one — is the most mysterious and glorious truth about God.  The Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit are all the same in their deity, attributes, and being, yet different in their function, office, and purpose.  I love that our God is a Trinitarian God.  It illustrates unity and diversity functioning together in perfect union, harmony, peace, love, respect, and a thousand other things.

In music, especially symphonies, we see a small reflection of this truth. I am not the musician in our house: Carly get’s that title.  She is gifted with a number of instruments and can sing beautifully.  What I do know is that a a full-size orchestra consists of about 100 people, and that they are all unique in their talents, functions, and purposes. In order for an orchestra to master a symphony, the musicians must not all be playing the flute.  They all have their own instruments; they fulfill their role and responsibility and trust that the others will do the same.

As one person plays, he is one part of a greater whole. As one person plays, there are a hundred other musicians who are playing their own notes, with their own sheet music, with their own purpose. Yet as each musician performs, the music comes together in perfect harmony, and art and beauty is created.

This is true of all music, not just the orchestra. When we listen to music, we must embrace the reality, and appreciate the harmony, of unity and diversity functioning together. Whether it is Coldplay or Skillet or the Boston Symphony Orchestra , music performed skillfully should lead us to worship the God who is diverse, yet unified and three, yet one.

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One comment

  1. Yes! This is what I’ve been trying to communicate to others for so long about my love for music and harmonies. I see God represented in beautiful music but have not been able to describe the emotional connection before. Thanks James!

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